Chiropractic may help with your "talking sickness" says Donald McDowell

Mr Donald McDowell is a chiropractor who makes his money from his customers in Canberra. He runs the Macquarie Chiropractic Clinic. He is/was a member of the rabid anti-vaccination pressure group, the Australian Vaccination Network. He is also seen as an elder statesman of Australian chiropractic. He is a stalwart of the Chiropractors’ Association of Australia, of course.

McDowell just blew my mind. He must be trolling, I thought. This just can’t be, given the repeated warnings from many different chiropractic quarters, including the Chiropractic Board of Australia, and the President of the CAA National, regarding the use of claims which are unable to be substantiated.

Well, he just shared this:  13 Surprising Health Conditions Chiropractic May Help.

McDowell 16 13 conditionsMcDowell said this:

This is a short list but shows the increasing data for good outcomes.

Data. Outcomes.

I’ll just include the final one. You can read the rest for yourself. Do have a look. Especially if you have testicles, hearing loss, or ADHD:

McDowell 17 talking sicknessI’d say this one was cured by the chiropractor, in 1921, who wore an onion on his belt, which was the style at the time.

The Chiropractic Board of Australia is complicit in this. It is clear that including chiropractic in the regulatory process has failed. It is also clear that allowing the use of the courtesy title “Dr” to these people, in return for getting them under the regulatory umbrella of AHPRA, is a dismal failure.

Chiropractors could drop their pants and moon the community and it wouldn’t be any more offensive and ridiculous than the current situation.

"This is a short list but shows the increasing data for good outcomes".

“This is a short list but shows the increasing data for good outcomes”.

Of course, even if you haven’t got testicles, he’ll do your buns:

This is not a photoshop. He is doing a rabbit.

This is not a photoshop. He is doing a rabbit.

 

 

About reasonable hank

I’m reasonable, mostly.

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0 Responses to Chiropractic may help with your "talking sickness" says Donald McDowell

  1. KS says:

    There is a wonderful statistical phenomenon called regression to the mean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regression_toward_the_mean). What that means in medicine is that whenever you take people from the extremities of a distribution they will on subsequent measurement be found to be closer on average to the mean. So people with depression will usually go to their doctor because things aren’t going well, but in a couple of months they will be much better whether or not they have treatment. So giving them lots of garlic will work, just that the right treatment will work better. That is why we run controlled trials, and why case reviews are only useful in extreme cases. Statisticians still haven’t succeeded in fully educating the medical community in over 50 years, so I’m not surprised the quacks are even worse.

    • Regression to the mean is precisely how they claim to treat ear infections. Amazing that a self resolving condition resolves within 7-10 days, with or without chiropractic. Chiropractic still claims credit, though. It’s only when something doesn’t work they won’t claim credit, and blame the patient.

      • wzrd1 says:

        In EMS, we have a similar regression to the mean saying.
        “Eventually, all bleeding shall stop. The only real question is how it stops.”
        Of course, it goes on to mention bleeding stopping due to clotting, intervention or exsanguination. The latter, of course, is quite discouraged in being permitted to occur.

        Noteworthy here is that he is quite guilty of plagiarism. But, he omitted the mention of bias from what he stole and re-resented from an event in 1921.
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11624041

        At first blush, I’d suspect encephalitis, probably viral. That would be a more likely malady that would have been ill understood at the time, as viral disease was not very well understood.
        Of course, with the sparse information I was able to find outside of paywalls, an enlightened differential is impossible.
        But, modern medicine was finally taking hold in the US back in 1921, evidence based medicine being chief in being advanced. Infectious disease was finally being more fully understood in the US, new knowledge was brought to the US from physicians who served in Europe during WWI, new techniques, new theories, etc.
        It wasn’t until 1931 that the virus was finally visualized under the new electron microscope, finally giving medicine knowledge of how a virus damages a cell.

        I just find it fascinating that the chiropractor had to reach all the way back to 1921 to find “evidence”. What is next?
        Going back to when medicine subscribed to the miasma theory of disease?
        But then, such practitioners tend to not be able to provide evidence based treatment information, so they instead provide a steaming pile of bovine excrement in its place.
        I’d not be surprised to hear of him treating bacterial meningitis by manipulation. Of course, if that were to occur, the problem would be self-limiting.
        It’s rather difficult to inflict such non-treatments when one is in prison for murder.

      • KS says:

        I remember seeing some trial data for antibiotics and ear infections. 90+% clear up in a week with placebo, add an extra 2% for standard antibiotics and another 2% for what was at the time a more serious antibiotic. I expect by now the standard will get you 0% extra and hopefully something extra from the serious. Another 10 years and it will be back to the 1930’s because if an ear infection won’t clear up on it’s own, then nothing much will work, and they’ll keep those for if you get meningitis.

      • wzrd1 says:

        That would only be true if no new antibiotics are developed.
        The problem with that line of thought is, there are always new antibiotics being developed, hence, the doom filled prediction of a decade finding antibiotics being ineffective is incorrect.

  2. SM says:

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again- attempting to regulate quackery especially when it is the quacks regulating the quack house is futile. Sham AHPRA regulation is more dangerous than no regulation – get rid of it. It would take a team of CBA minions 10 years to discipline all of the naughty quacks that have by exposed by Hank.

  3. Hope says:

    I think Elma Fudd wouldn’t have sunk to such a low ebb. Can animal cruelty be added to the growing list of shambles against Chiros?

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