Anti-vaccine author appears in health insurance advertisement

In 2008, Andi Lew wrote a book with her former husband, anti-vaccine chiropractor and Chiropractors’Association of Australia (Victoria) board member, Warren Sipser. Sipser is/was also a member of the disgraced anti-vaccination organisation, the Australian Vaccination Network.

The book – 7 Things Your Doctor Forgot to Tell You: A Guide for Optimal Health – is an anti-vaccination standard which advises that homeopathy can be administered in lieu of real immunisation. I addressed the contents of the book’s anti-vaccine chapter in my 2013 post. For some reason the book is still available and no regulatory action has been taken against Sipser, who also remains on the CAA VIC board.

Andi Lew also appeared in this blog when she was interviewed by 9 News Melbourne, in 2014, as another just a mum, for an immunisation story; without declaring her anti-vaccine credentials.

Two days ago Lew told her Facebook friends about a new advertisement in which she appears:

Lew 10 Fb post ad Feb 22 2016

The advertisement is for a health insurer, GMHBA. Andi Lew plays an optometrist in the ad. And she even made the cover photo for GMHBA’s Facebook page:

Lew 11 GMHBA Fb cover photo

Whoops.

A huge thank you to reader “J” for pointing this out.

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About reasonable hank

I’m reasonable, mostly.

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3 Responses to Anti-vaccine author appears in health insurance advertisement

  1. GiJoel says:

    Maybe they’re homeopathic glasses?

  2. Jack says:

    Oh dear… do you think they knew when they hired her? Surely someone would have googled?

  3. Who? says:

    I’m about to change health insurers to one that doesn’t require me to pay a premium for a rebate for using a range of alternative therapies: they sit in the same line as things like dentistry and optometry, which are perfectly respectable, and efficacious, things to buy. Private health insurance needs a shakeup.

    I understand people like alternative therapies, but I like the beauty therapist and I can’t see why if someone can get a rebate for homeopathy I can’t get one for a facial that makes me look dewy, momentarily at least.

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